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................Camberwell was once itself a pretty village with the Lord's, or Freiherrn's, 'castle' in the middle of the green and surroundings that were favoured hunting grounds of England's Kings for centuries. The area maintained such traditions for nearly a thousand years, right up to when the Surrey Fox Hunt kept its hounds on what so became known as Dog Kennel Hill SE23. Ironically, today they would probably have found more foxes around the local streets and gardens than they ever did in the vanished fields and woods!

................ Many roads around the old Camberwell Borough are still known as 'groves': tree-lined lanes which once separated the smallholdings and horticultural garden farms which supplied the City of London with fruit, vegetables and herbs.

Camberwell Beauty (Nymphalis antiopa) butterflies

................During the early eighteenth century it was noted for being the haunt of a rare butterfly (Nymphalis antiopa), duely named "Camberwell Beauty" and recently adopted as a civic symbol.

................A hundred years later, the village was still so idyllic that Johan Mendelssohn, who stayed nearby in 1842, composed his popular "Spring Song" while walking there. He even firstly called it "Camberwell Green"! The site of the house where he stayed is marked in Ruskin Park by a sundial.
................The area was also an inspiration to the 19th century poet Robert Browning who was born and grew up in Southampton Way near 'the Green'.

................The roads leading from Camberwell to Dulwich Village are Denmark Hill and its continuation, Herne Hill - another reference to the ancient title for the Lord of the Manor.

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